Ex-MP Warns Muslim Brotherhood Usurping Army

Filed under: Africa,Featured |
Mohammed Mursi photo

Egypt’ newly elected president Mohammed Mursi

Former member of Egypt’s dissolved parliament, Mohamed Abu Hamed, warned of what he described as “Muslim Brotherhood penetration in the military institution” and usurping Egypt’s army, putting national security in danger.

The liberal ex-MP argued that the Muslim Brotherhood’s President-elect Mohamed Mursi does not represent Egyptians, their ideologies, or the January 25 Revolution.

Abu Hamid supported Mursi’s opponent, army general Ahmed Shafiq, who served as toppled President Hosni Mubarak’s last premier before his ouster.

“The Muslim Brotherhood must be prevented from penetrating the military institution and the decision of war must be secured”, Abu Hamed said.

Article 53 of the Constitutional Declaration, issued by the ruling military council on June 17, compels Egypt’s president to acquire the ruling military council’s approval prior declaring war.

Abu Hamid suggested that the military institution must be protected from “political appointments by the Brotherhood president”, explaining that when political forces wish to control a state, they always start by usurping the army.

“Islamist groups have Jihadist visions; if they took over the army, the decision to go to war will be an easy one and against the interest of national security”, Abu Hamed said, adding that the Muslim Brotherhood “have 18, 000 security cadres to seize power over the military and security institutions”.

Abu Hamed went on to argue that the fragility of civil and pro-revolution forces and furious political polarization are what led to Mursi’s victory.

“The elections took place under extraordinary conditions and amid religious and political polarization – Egyptians voted for Mursi in fear of Shafiq, who is associated with the former regime, not in, approval of Mursi, or belief in his presidential platform”, Abu Hamed argued.

He added that the Brotherhood’s organizational skills and ability to mobilize votes also played a role in Mursi’s victory.

The liberal politician argued that Egypt under Muslim Brotherhood rule will not be different from Egypt under the dissolved National Democratic Party, formerly headed by Mubarak, “in the sense that parties and individuals who are loyal to the Brotherhood will be the only ones on the surface while even the opposition will be very tamed”.