Zimbabwe’s Zanu-PF Criticizes Jacob Zuma

Filed under: Africa |
Jacob Zuma photo

South Africa’s unpopular president, Jacob Zuma

South African President Jacob Zuma has come under fierce criticism from President Robert Mugabe’s Zanu PF party, which accuses him of interfering in Zimbabwe’s internal affairs.

Zuma who is the Southern African Development Community (SADC) mediator in the Zimbabwean crisis angered Zanu PF when he refused to entertain Deputy Prime Minister Arthur Mutambara at the just ended Heads of State summit in Maputo Mozambique.

Mutambara lost the leadership of his MDC party to Industry and Trade minister Welshman Ncube but Mugabe has refused to ask him to make way for his rival as a principal in the inclusive government.

SADC resolved that Mutambara must not be invited to future meetings of the regional body despite protests from the Zimbabwean leader.

Zanu PF politburo member accused Zuma of “illegally” installing Ncube as a principal in the inclusive government because they are related.

“Zuma used his much-awaited night visit to Harare (last week) ostensibly to review GPA (Global Political Agreement) progress ahead of Friday’s SADC summit in Maputo to unilaterally install Welshman Ncube, who is also an in-law of his, as a GPA principal in a manner that shockingly violated Zimbabwe’s Constitution and sovereignty,” Moyo wrote in the state media.

Moyo advised Ncube to “refrain from pushing his in-laws in South Africa to bid for his politically hopeless and illegal cause”.

Mugabe early this year threatened to reject as a Zuma’s facilitator saying he was biased.

Zuma adopted a hardline stance on Zimbabwe last year as he pushed the country’s three governing parties to work towards an uncontested poll result.

According to reports, at the summit Mugabe’s spirited attempt to defend Mutambara was rejected by SADC head of states.

Tanzanian President Jakaya Kikwete, Namibian President Hifikepunye Pohamba and Botswana President Ian Khama were vocal aganist Mugabe whose only backing came from Zambian president Micheal Sata.