Home Africa Egypt Army Gives Mursi 48 Hours to Share Power

Egypt Army Gives Mursi 48 Hours to Share Power

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Mursi’s movement complained at the lack of police protection, which can only heighten its sense of being under siege from both the liberal opposition and state officialdom inherited from the old regime.

Not Talking 

Liberal protest organizers, who declared Mursi ousted by people power on Sunday, said they hoped people would stay in the streets until Mursi left.

Mursi, who has not appeared in person, earlier renewed offers via allies of dialogue and pledged to work with a new parliament if disputes over election rules can be ironed out. But he has so far offered no substantial concessions.

The opposition does not trust the Islamist movement, which critics accuse of using a series of electoral victories to monopolize power. They want a total reset of the rules of a democracy imperfectly worked out over the past two years.

The massive protests showed that the Brotherhood has not only alienated liberals and secularists by seeking to entrench Islamic rule, notably in a new constitution, but has also angered millions of Egyptians with economic mismanagement.

Tourism and investment have dried up, inflation is rampant and fuel supplies are running short, with power cuts lengthening in the summer heat and motorists spending hours fuelling cars.

The cost of insuring government debt against default surged to record highs. Forward contracts indicated a significant fall for the pound against the dollar.

Some uniformed policemen marched among protesters in Cairo and Alexandria, chanting “the police and the people are one”, and several senior officers addressed the Tahrir Square crowd. An independent police association said they stood with demonstrators and would not let them down.

“The Egyptian people will not fight this battle alone but will be supported by the judiciary, the national police and the armed forces,” the Police Club statement said.

Adding to the failure to protect the Brotherhood headquarters, that cast doubt on whether Mursi could rely on the security forces to clear the streets if he gave the order.

The United States and the European Union have urged Mursi to share power with the opposition, saying only a national consensus can help Egypt overcome a severe economic crisis and build democratic institutions.

U.S. President Barack Obama renewed a call for Mursi and his adversaries to cooperate, just as Sisi’s statement was made.

The Pentagon, which funds the Egyptian army heavily, said it could not speculate on what was about to happen in Egypt.

 

By: Yasmine Saleh and Maggie Fick

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