Israel To Ship African Refugees To Uganda

Israel Confirms Plan to Expel African Refugees to Uganda
Israels Saharonim concentration camp where Africans including children are rounded up and imprisoned

AFRICANGLOBE – Israel has made a deal to ship African refugees – which Israel continues to illegally label “migrants” and “infiltrators” to Uganda. Uganda – which has a bad human rights record – is taking them in exchange for military and other aid.

It turns out that the unnamed African country Israel plans to (almost certainly illegally) deport thousands of African refugees to is Uganda.

Ha’aretz reports:

Dismas Nkunda, a journalist and human rights activist who focuses on refugee issues told Israeli newspaper Haaretz that he had heard rumors. But when he asked the national refugee agency, he was told they were not aware of any agreement. “The agreement was probably done by another government agency dealing with foreign relations,” he said. “It is clearly in return for business relations and the extensive weapons deals between Israel and Uganda. There is very close cooperation between the two countries. It isn’t surprising that the refugees agency hasn’t been updated.”

Around a quarter of a million refugees currently live in Uganda, mainly Rwandans, Sudanese and Congolese. Most recent arrivals have fled the fighting in the Democratic Republic of Congo. The migrants from Israel will most likely be sent to the camps run by the United Nations Refugee Agency. “There are terrible conditions in these places,” says Nkunda. “They are basically large prisons and the refugees are not allowed out without permission from the authorities. We call them ‘warehouses for human beings.’”

Nkunda says that “the human rights organizations here have not yet begun to prepare for the arrival of refugees from Israel but when we receive confirmation, we will lodge our protest. This is a clear infringement on their human rights. These people did not choose to travel to Uganda, there is a clear reason why they sought asylum in Israel.”

Uganda holds periodic elections (which Museveni wins by a landslide) but the country is routinely criticized by human rights organizations for the control of the media, the limits put on opposition parties, persecution of minorities and the endemic violence of police and security forces.

The three most serious human rights problems in the country were a lack of respect for the integrity of the person (including unlawful killings, torture, and other abuse of suspects and detainees); unwarranted restrictions on civil liberties (including freedom of assembly, the media, and association); and violence and discrimination against marginalized groups such as women (including female genital mutilation/cutting (FGM/C), children (including victims of sexual abuse) and persons with disabilities.

Other human rights problems included harsh prison conditions; arbitrary and politically motivated arrest and detention; incommunicado and lengthy pretrial detention; restrictions on the right to a fair trial; restrictions on freedom of press; electoral irregularities; official corruption; mob violence; trafficking in persons; and forced labor, including child labor.

From the US State Department’s Human Rights report on Uganda:

…The three most serious human rights problems in the country were a lack of respect for the integrity of the person (including unlawful killings, torture, and other abuse of suspects and detainees); unwarranted restrictions on civil liberties (including freedom of assembly, the media, and association); and violence and discrimination against marginalized groups such as women (including female genital mutilation/cutting (FGM/C), children (including victims of sexual abuse and ritual killing), persons with disabilities, and the lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) community.

Other human rights problems included harsh prison conditions; arbitrary and politically motivated arrest and detention; incommunicado and lengthy pretrial detention; restrictions on the right to a fair trial; restrictions on freedom of press; electoral irregularities; official corruption; mob violence; trafficking in persons; and forced labor, including child labor.…

From Human Rights Watch:

After 26 years of President Yoweri Museveni’s rule, ongoing threats to freedom of expression, assembly, and association continue to raise serious concerns. Security forces largely enjoy impunity for torture, extrajudicial killings, and the deaths of at least 49 people during protests in 2009 and 2011.  The government banned a political pressure group calling for peaceful change, obstructed opposition rallies, and harassed and intimidated journalists and civil society activists working on corruption, oil, land, and sexual rights. The notorious Anti-Homosexuality Bill, still proposing the death penalty for some consensual same-sex activity, looms in parliament. The law criminalizing torture went into force, though challenges to prosecutions persist.